lalondes:

THEY’RE BEST FRIENDS… HOW DID I NOT KNOW ABOUT THIS BEFORE NOW…

(Source: fyeahgg)

buckyoubucky:

"A new study shows that men are threatened by confident women taking pictures of themselves, and call these women stupid, socially inept, and ugly. In other news, the world is round, the sky is blue, and the patriarchy is still shitty."

buckyoubucky:

"A new study shows that men are threatened by confident women taking pictures of themselves, and call these women stupid, socially inept, and ugly. In other news, the world is round, the sky is blue, and the patriarchy is still shitty."

(Source: lady-dixon)

(Source: jjanoskians)

fredsavageiii:

this whole exchange was golden

sandstormderude:

Can Kim and Kanye be my parents

save-spock-and-roll:

when no one in class is ready for the test

image

(Source: best-of-imgur)

whosaprettypolyglot:

maskedlinguist:

lindentreeisle:

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

LINGUISTIC BITCHSLAP.

Thank you. I was too lazy to find my post.

Fun related fact - the meaning of the word “November” in several Slavic languages (and “October” in Croatian because fuck you that’s why) - variations on listopad - is also named for falling leaves, list being “leaf” and pad being “fall”.

whosaprettypolyglot:

maskedlinguist:

lindentreeisle:

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

LINGUISTIC BITCHSLAP.

Thank you. I was too lazy to find my post.

Fun related fact - the meaning of the word “November” in several Slavic languages (and “October” in Croatian because fuck you that’s why) - variations on listopad - is also named for falling leaves, list being “leaf” and pad being “fall”.

(Source: pleatedjeans)

Happy 7th birthday, Deathly Hallows!

(Source: simplypotterheads)